User avatar
By Wheaters
#85284
I'd previously retarded the inlet cam by a tooth, as is often suggested, very early on in my ownership of the bike. I am fairly sure it helped a little at the top end, but that's not what's needed in view of the main use I now intend to put the bike to. Since doing this (done while I had the top end off the engine to replace the faulty exhaust valve seat the bike came with) I've also fitted a new "Woodsman" exhaust and new carburettor. The new carb has noticeably improved the running of the bike - it's a first kick starter now and there's no sign of the old problem of fuel starvation on full throttle.

However, the cam timing.. Today I decided to remove the timing cover to put the cam timing back to standard. I was pleased to see that everything in there was pristine clean. I had a new oil pump drive spindle already in stock just in case I might find undue wear on the original but didn't need it and the pump assembly passed the "thumb" test. Having very recently changed the oil, I decided not the drain the tank and waste all the new oil. However, I soon realised there was a continuous dribble of oil from the feed oilway. I put a small blob of soft grease in the oilway, which held back the oil just enough for me to get the job done, but without blocking the oilway permanently!

All went back together easily. A test ride this afternoon made me quickly realise how much "bottom end" performance I'd lost by advancing the cam!

The bike is now much "softer" and will trickle along at low speed much more readily. I rode a few byways and was very pleased to find it was easier to ride off-road. The top end is a bit less snappy than it was, but still good enough for the faster main roads.

Another step in the right direction. :idea:
User avatar
By Adrian
#85286
The trick of retarding the inlet cam by one tooth is usually recommended with higher compression engines, if you're running standard compression it might not have achieved an awful lot on a 350.

A.
User avatar
By Wheaters
#85288
It did make a difference, the top speed is now reduced. But for now, what I've gained by going back to standard timing suits my needs better.

I if I fancy a fast ride, I take out my other more modern bike anyway. I say more modern - it's a 1991 bike, as opposed to the 2004 Bullet, but it's a 750 and has 4 cylinders ;) .
User avatar
By Wheaters
#85346
Next steps in preparation for the MCC trial:
Yesterday I decided to strip the primary side, check everything over and examine the clutch. I'd suffered some clutch slip and a loss of adjustment. I removed the plates and noticed that although it looked very serviceable overall, one plain steel plate, in the middle of the stack, was slightly "blued". All plates were solvent washed and the plain plates gently re-surfaced with fine abrasive cloth. The difference this has made to the clutch action and gearchange is very noticeable and I can now find neutral far more easily, so it must have been dragging, too. Rather than refill the chaincase with ATF, like I had previously used, because the old stuff smelled a little toasty, I've opted for a high quality 10W/40 bike oil which I had on the shelf.

In a very rash moment today I decided to fit a larger rear sprocket - hell to the expense - so I've ordered one of Mr. H's machined brake drums and a 46 tooth sprocket plus a longer chain to match. I just hope the missus doesn't notice the £200 bill! I still have the smaller front sprocket but decided that I'd try this method first. I still have the option of a 50 tooth sprocket if this isn't low enough.

Having read again suggestions made by others, one thing occurred to me. Another way to "lower" the overall gearing is to fit a smaller primary (i.e. crankshaft) sprocket. However, that will also "gear up" the kickstart mechanism (more engine rotation angle per kick). Might this put undue strain on the pawl and ratchet mechanism? It would surely need more effort to kick over. Theoretical question only - I don't now intend to do this.
User avatar
By Presto
#85349
Your choice of 20/40 oil is a mistake. ATF is always the choice of the wise and knowing.
And what’s wrong with the smell of toast!? Preferably edging towards burnt with marmite! ;)
User avatar
By Wheaters
#85350
But my choice of oil wasn't 20W/40.... :?: :?: Should've gone to :ugeek: savers?

I previously followed the wise and knowing and suffered a slipping clutch.
By mauri
#85358
Wheaters wrote:
Tue Sep 10, 2019 2:50 pm
Having read again suggestions made by others, one thing occurred to me. Another way to "lower" the overall gearing is to fit a smaller primary (i.e. crankshaft) sprocket. However, that will also "gear up" the kickstart mechanism (more engine rotation angle per kick). Might this put undue strain on the pawl and ratchet mechanism? It would surely need more effort to kick over. Theoretical question only - I don't now intend to do this.

when the pawl can handle this kind of compression

Image

that little gear is not going to hurt it
User avatar
By Presto
#85362
OK - in fact I had a Specsavers invitation yesterday!
I may take the opportunity!

But (as I don't have time to read every contribution to this thread) can you explain why yesterday you said:

'Rather than refill the chaincase with ATF, like I had previously used, because the old stuff smelled a little toasty, I've opted for a high quality 10W/40 bike oil which I had on the shelf.'
User avatar
By Wheaters
#85365
Because that's what I did.However, if you don't read a contribution, why make adverse comment on it?

As I wrote.....and you've just copied and pasted, so you appear to have read it at least twice... on this occasion I used 10W/40 oil.

NOT 20/40 as for some unfathomable reason you seem to think I used. :|
User avatar
By Presto
#85366
Well I never! That will make all the difference! As long as it wasn't 20/40!!!!

The point I have made remains the same.
Oil whether 20/40 or 10/40 - or 5/40 or 15/50 or ??/?? or whatever - isn't the way to go with these clutches.

AFT is the wise choice.
Of course you're welcome to put whatever you prefer in your primary drive, for whatever reason you decide.

I've given my advise - based on plenty of experience - for the sake of other riders who may be tempted to make the same mistake. The sound advice is not to put engine oil in the clutches of Bullets.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 15

Shop for accessories at Hitchcocks Motorcycles