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By Wheaters
#84471
I've entered the Motor Cycling Club's Edinburgh Trial on my 350 Bullet, which actually takes place mainly in the Peak District in early October. I've competed in this twice before in a car and marshal on other similar trials.

However, as this will be my first attempt on a bike I've decided not to do the full trial which starts at Tamworth Services on the M42 in the very early hours and involves 200 miles including some night sections. I'm only doing the daylight part, which is approx 80 miles including the off-road sections (plus another 35 miles each way from the start and finish) so about 150 miles all in.

I've done a fair amount of "green laneing" on this bike over this last couple of years and (and this afternoon) and have been pleasantly surprised how well it copes. I've equipped it with suitable tyres and just fitted a high level "Woodsman" exhaust system plus a few other small "tweaks". I have bought a 14 T gearbox sprocket to give better control at low speeds (standard is a 15 T) , yet to be fitted.

Does anyone else here have any off-road experience on a 350, especially on this type of event? If so, anyone have any tips to pass on? I'm thinking of the bike, rather than trialling in general.

Thanks.
User avatar
By stinkwheel
#84472
Watching with interest as I fancy a go at this too.

particularly interested in how thr brakes cope with restarts on steep inclines. TLS drums are not renowned for their ability to stop a bike rolling backwards (because they become twin trailing brakes). I've been looking seriously about either fitting an older SLS (but full width 7" are hard to come by, and shoes are no longer manufactured) or a half-width hub.

Also interested in the viability of just using a 19" front.
User avatar
By Wheaters
#84473
I'd never try to stop myself from rolling back on the front brake - even if you lock the wheel the bike will slide back and you'll lose control and fall off hard, hopefully not over the "high" side or you can get badly hurt (no need to ask me how I know)!

From experience, the rear brake is the one to use on a steep uphill slope - as you come to a halt, right foot down, left foot hard on rear brake pedal. Being a single leading shoe brake, it works equally well in reverse. Not having your right hand on the front brake lever means you don't have to juggle two things at once , all you have to do (all, he says...) is adjust the throttle to set off.
User avatar
By Wheaters
#84480
Correction to the above...the standard sprocket on a 350 is of course 16T. My replacement is a 15T.
User avatar
By stinkwheel
#84485
After viewing quite a few videos of classic trials, while the concept of holding the rear brake on for a re-start is laudable, it is also not always possible... then you stall the engine.
By Super45
#84491
If your doing proper off road sections as opposed to green lanes may be worth investing in a sump bash plate as the 2 drain plugs on the engine are quite vulnerable where they are underneath
User avatar
By Wheaters
#84497
Super45,

Yes, good advice. Some of the sections are unpredictably rough and rocky - I remember one in particular where I damaged the front suspension and mudguard of my trials car about 15 years ago after hitting a high step caused by exposed concrete (protection for a 6" drain pipe which crossed the track).

I was looking at the sump guard in Mr. H's catalogue last night. Seems expensive for what it is, but a good insurance. I made one for my car which is about six times the size of the one needed on a Bullet, for a lot less money.
User avatar
By Wheaters
#84499
stinkwheel wrote:
Fri Aug 02, 2019 11:30 am
After viewing quite a few videos of classic trials, while the concept of holding the rear brake on for a re-start is laudable, it is also not always possible... then you stall the engine.
No, not always possible - but that's part of the challenge. If you do stall the engine on a restart, or anywhere on the hill, you will be marked down as stopped i.e. failed the section.

I've done a fair amount of marshaling/observing on these trials over the years and it's often possible to tell if a rider is likely to fail a restart by the way they approach the "box"; it's often a hint of a rider control problem on the approach, or lack of engine torque when setting off again.

The nice thing about Bullets is that they have good low down torque and when suitably geared can "potter" up most hills under control at a relatively slow speed. What's more, being in Class "A" they don't have to do some restarts at all, whereas riders on modern and supposedly more capable bikes, do have to do all of them. Class "A" is for pre-1970 bikes and all RE Bullets, irrespective of age. Hence my decision to have a go. ;)
User avatar
By stinkwheel
#84501
Good to know Bullets are treated like their design age rather than their actual age. Mine's a 2007.

I was going to weld something up using flat bar and alloy plate for a bash plate. There's no shortage of lugs to attach to.
User avatar
By Wheaters
#84503
Sounds like a good way to do it; I'll be looking at similar.

I've just found more info about my MCC Trial entry. Apparently there are no restarts for Class A bikes on the sections I'll be doing.

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