#85155
Yes, cafe racers and trials/street scramblers ad nauseam are well catered for, I get that these don't float everyone's boat, although they must be a sizeable chunk of our hosts' business. RE India seem to be turning out "military editions" of the EFI Bullets fairly regularly, too. But has anyone come up with a home-brew Bullet flat tracker (OK, street tracker) lately?

I found this bit of art-work on line a while ago, I'll just leave it here for your consideration.

A.
Attachments
REBulletTracker500.jpg
#85160
Adrian wrote:
Thu Aug 29, 2019 9:55 pm
I'm now bobbing her for posing reasons
Oh, not another one. :roll: How about something more original?
A.

I agree, but what about your catch can ;) :D

John
#85161
I have also built a custom bike. A little bit "bobber", a little bit "flat track" (I hate labels).

Calling any genre of custom bike unoriginal is a fairly uneducated statement. There are so many variables and possibilities within any "type" of custom. There are shitty, unoriginal bobbers/café racers/trackers and there are just as many awesome, interesting, well thought out ones. Even the names of genres, mean nothing, or anything, cause they get tossed around and re-interpreted so much.

If someone has taken the time and gone to the effort to get their hands dirty and work on their bike themselves, whether that's total customisation, fitting accessories or just DIY servicing then I think they should be applauded...regardless of taste.

I know this is the Internet and folks just can't seem to help getting negative...but I vote we keep things positive and about sharing knowledge and facts...not shooting others down based on opinions.

I'm not a hippy, honest!
peace,
Chris
Attachments
Enfield.JPG
Add description
#85162
You don't see many enfield chops. Full goose-neck, over-standard forks, apehangers and knees in the breeze kind of thing. I did have a punt at an Uncle Bunt bullet frame that popped up on ebay a few months back but bidding got a bit too rich for my taste.

It's a pretty engine, would probably lend itself to a chop. Although the frame is less simple with the twinned top-tube arrangement. Would be a right sod to rake out then line up again I'd imagine. You'd probably want angled slab yokes instead.
#85163
TexasChris wrote:
Fri Aug 30, 2019 1:23 pm

If someone has taken the time and gone to the effort to get their hands dirty and work on their bike themselves, whether that's total customisation, fitting accessories or just DIY servicing then I think they should be applauded...regardless of taste.

peace,
Chris
Actually Chris, totally agree with this. I do all my own maintenance, although the novelty of changing some tyres has worn off!

I see some customisation as skillful, but I suppose I've seen some Beemers which have had half their bits removed and then the owner asks a very silly price, when the engineering is..... erm... not that good.

Anyway, as long as any removed bits don't go in a skip then all well and good.
#85164
Count Johnny wrote:Not exactly challenging, engineering wise, is it?

A high level exhaust, a placcy tail unit and a Tupperware box nailed to the side. ;)
Does it actually have to be an engineering challenge? For some, maybe, for the rest of us, no.

I have seen the work you have put into Slo Poke, and it certainly did not just jump out of a kit catalogue, but as with any highly individual bike which has been seriously modified, it's not what everyone wants.

There's no harm in giving a bike a cosmetic make-over, or tarting it up, if you prefer, but you might have to be able to put it back to something like standard when you want to sell it. I suspect insurance is easier that way too, though how easy was it to insure Slo Poke, as a matter of interest?

A.

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